Posts tagged ‘sin’

The Word Shall Heal

Pope Benedict XVI celebrates the Eucharist, a ...

Image via Wikipedia

One of my most favorite moments in the Catholic Mass is when as a congregation, everyone speaks together during the Eucharistic celebration, “Lord, I am not worthy to receive you, but only say the Word and I shall be healed.” This is derived from today’s Gospel reading. The centurion, a man of compassion and great faith, humbles himself to the Lord to ask for healing for his suffering servant who lies at home paralyzed.

Lord, I am not worthy to have you under my roof; only say the word and my servant will be healed. (Matt 8:8 NAB)

The adaptation in the Mass embodies a great deal of my core faith. Without humility, I cannot surrender to God‘s will. If I cannot surrender, I cannot be in full union with God. Out of union with God, I am discontent, without joy. Without joy, I cannot fully love. God created me to love and be loved. Without humility I cannot be the person God created me to be.

I am to receive the Lord. I am to be open. I am to recognize God as a gift. I am to recognize that God comes to me, is with me. We’ve never really been apart except in our minds. I am to welcome God into my heart as an honored guest.

I’ve found so many Protestants to be pleasantly enlightened by my explanation of the Eucharistic Celebration in the Catholic Church. They are quite happy to discover we don’t believe in cannibalism. They are then intrigued that our belief in the real presence of Christ is rooted in believing that the Eucharistic Celebration reunites us with Christ in time and place. While the Spirit is with me always, I’m filled with such gratitude to be joined with Christ each time I participate in the wondrous experience of Holy Communion. I feel even more personally connected to God which sets the foundation for what is said next.

When we say, “only say the word,” I think of three things. First, God is so powerful that only God’s voice, not God’s physical presence, is necessary to animate God’s will. Yet, the Creator gave us Christ to be a physical presence to humanity. Second, I imagine “word” to be capitalized. The Creator spoke us all, including Jesus the Christ, into being. Third, the Word who existed since the world began is the source of our healing. The moment concludes with the assurance that our hope is in the Lord and we shall be healed. Isaiah reminds us that the glory of the Lord is made manifest through God’s merciful cleansing of our souls, bringing light to the darkness. If I allow it, welcome it, welcome Christ into my heart, I am healed today in so many ways.

To Contemplate
For whom do you struggle to have empathy and compassion?
What is your reason to receive communion…to comply with tradition, to be comforted, to be more fully united with Christ the Lord in the mission of bringing peace and salvation to the world?
Where do you see opportunities to bring God’s message and ministry of healing to those around you?
When will you know that you are fully healed?
Why is it so difficult for you as an individual to feel a personal connection with God?
How can you better prepare yourself for the coming of Christ in glory?

To Devote Ourselves, We Pray
Lord you have washed away our sins, healed us and made us stronger. We are in awe of your compassion and power. Gently humble our hearts to recognize our unworthiness, empower us with empathy and fill us with compassion. As we have been healed and are filled with Your presence, let us likewise share the same with all those about us, bringing peace to one moment, one person at a time until you come again to heal in full all who will receive you. Amen

A Word About the Word: Advent

Detail - Glory of the New Born Christ in prese...

Image via Wikipedia

A deeper understanding of anything can begin with a thorough definition.  The word advent has its origins in the Latin adventus, meaning “coming”. Dictionaries generally agree upon the modern definition as “the coming, approach or arrival into place, view or being – especially of an extremely important event, change, person, or state”.  Any etymology dictionary will take that a step further to let you know that adventus is the past participle stem of the Latin advenire “arrive, come to,” from ad- “to” + venire “to come”.

I think it is valuable to consider the fullness of this definition. What is the significance of the words “coming, approach or arrival,” of “place, view or being,” of “event, change, person, or state”?  Given its roots, shouldn’t we consider the word advent to at least equally be defined as the “coming to”?  Why is that addition meaningful?  Just the definition of advent gives us ample guidance for devotion to a deeper relationship with the God of our understanding, but especially Jesus the Christ of the Judeo-Christian heritage, as we enter upon and traverse the Advent Season of the Liturgical Calendar.

How often have you struggled with feeling alone, disconnected, apart from?  If not from people, what about in your relationship with a Higher Power, something or someone more powerful and wise than you or humanity as a whole?  Many times, even when we are committed to a faithful existence and exercise our spiritual muscles in religious practices, prayers, or acts of piety, we “know” God loves us, but still feel a sense of distance.  The Christian Bible proclaims , “whenever two or more of you are gathered in My name, I am there.”  Perhaps you lament, “So, what about the rest of the time?”

Our Creator sent Jesus the Christ to us. When Our Lord left this world to dwell at Our Holy Parent’s right hand, He sent the Holy Spirit, the fullness of their love, to be with us. Our Salvation comes to us. Our Comforter comes to us. We don’t have to go looking or begging. Already, because “our bodies are a temple for the Lord”, we are never alone. We take God into all that we do. We make God a part of every choice, even if we do so unconsciously. We can neither hide from God nor is God hidden from us. This implies both a privilege and a responsibility.

The definition doesn’t end there. Advent means also “arrival (to arrive)” from the Latin ad ripam “to the shore,” from ad “to” + ripa “shore”, referring originally to touching ashore after a long voyage. Indeed, we would want to welcome such a weary traveler with pleasantries and all they need. As advent means “approach”, it means “the coming nearer to” from the Latin appropiare “go nearer to,” from the Latin ad- “to” + propiare “come nearer” (the comparative of prope “near”). All these definitions imply concerted and thoughtful effort on the part of the person coming. We can be grateful we are on the receiving end.

While the Spirit dwell within us, Christ the Lord will return to this world to “judge the living and the dead.” An approach is a process and something we can “see” developing. We can prepare. The word arrival defined as “the coming to a position or state of mind” reminds us that as Christ Jesus comes to contemplate and render judgment upon our lives, we might do well to begin such preparation in our minds. Jesus Or Lord will be a new vision, a triumphant king, ready to rule the new kingdom of Heaven on Earth.

If this is to be our Advent, we must watch with new eyes, be open to transformation, and ready to leave the false comforts of our homes. We must recognize and celebrate that, as “approach” figuratively suggests “a means of handling a problem, etc.,” Jesus the Christ is Our Means, Our Answer.  We must welcome the One who will melt our icy hearts and minds to flow with Him, the Living Water.  Our great sin is in forgetting or rejecting that we are bound eternally to God, not being ever mindful and conscious of our connection.  Christ Jesus has shown us The Way to reconnect, to see again the Truth of our relationship with Our Creator.

The Way is to love as Jesus loved. For in whatever manner we are unloving of others, we are unloving of Jesus the Christ, of Our Creator, Our Lord God, and ultimately of ourselves – we who are “made in the image of God.”  How can we be complete and content if we are at war with ourselves?  It is time for us to “come to,” to wake up to the reality that the only aloneness we must face is that which we create for ourselves by not being ready to greet God face-to-face.

For Contemplation to “Come To” (recover consciousness)
About what have I been in denial?
How have I tried to hide from God?
Why do I resist being in full union with God?
In whose face do I struggle to see Christ?
Where in darkness have I unwittingly taken the Holy Spirit with me?
When will I be ready for Christ’s return?

For Devotion
This simple prayer I offer Lord…
It matters not how small I am; You are My All and I am Yours.
Let my mind and heart be ever open to Your presence
and my hands never closed to Your bidding.
Ever more, let me ask “What is the next right thing?”
Ever more let me hear and see Your answer in the echoes,
the same message from two unique sources,
that I might live the simplicity of Your Love that indwells me
until You, Christ the Lord, come in glory to rule forever more.
Lord, My God, let it be.

Loading image

Click anywhere to cancel

Image unavailable

 

 

We Are Thieves

Illustration for Cheating

Image via Wikipedia

We are a web of existence.  Each act we choose eventually affects every other person.

For as long as we benefit from the righteous acts of others and fail to choose to act our most righteous,

we are taking more than giving,

receiving more than we deserve,

obtaining wealth dishonestly.

We may commit no blatant or obvious act of dishonesty or cheating,…

no crime for which we may be punished,

nothing for which we would be disgraced if found out…

but whenever we do not do our best, we’re cheating someone.

Whenever we make excuses for even our most minor faults, we’re being dishonest with others and ourselves.

Whenever we fail to put forth the effort to develop the gifts God’s given us, we are thieves!

And whenever in our pride we remain silent when we need help becoming the persons God wants us to be

or deny others the right to help us,

it is then we act most selfishly.